SPA SECTION NEWSLETTER, Volume XVII, Issue 27

Table of Contents
=======================================================================
1. Update on the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) Budgets
for 2010 and 2011
2. University Computing Requests for NSF-supported University Projects:
Reminder on Large Request Deadline: March 29, 2010
3. Solar Orbiter Selected for Next Phase of ESA's Cosmic Vision
Programme
4. RapidMag Project Delivers Near-real-time Magnetometer Data from
Auroral Zone Stations in Russia
5. Final Announcement: The 12th Quadrennial Solar-Terrestrial Physics
Symposium of SCOSTEP, July 12-16, 2010, Berlin, Germany
***Deadline for Abstract Submission is April 6, 2010***
6. Abstract Deadline for EJSM Open Science Workshop – 15th April 2010
=======================================================================

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* * * . . . . . . .
* * * AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION .
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* ********* * SPA SECTION NEWSLETTER . ..
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* * *********** * * Volume XVII, Issue 27 . o .
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* ********* * March 25, 2010 . ..
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* * * Editor: Peter Chi .
* * * Editorial Coordinator: Sharon Uy . . . . . . .
* Email: editor at igpp.ucla.edu
SPA Web Site: http://spc.igpp.ucla.edu/spa/

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———————————————————————–
1. Update on the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) Budgets
for 2010 and 2011
———————————————————————–
From: Doug Biesecker <Doug.Biesecker at noaa.gov>

A few weeks ago the President's proposed FY11 (fiscal year 2011) budget
was released. (For NOAA see:
http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2010/20100201_budget.html) This
step in the budget process, prompts us to inform the space science
community about the good news for the NOAA Space Weather Prediction
Center, the customers we serve, and the partnerships we value.

1. FY10: NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center received a $2.7 M
increase to our base budget. This will enable us to move forward with
the transition of models into operations.

2. FY11: the President's proposed budget includes:

a. An increase of $2.0 M to SWPC's base budget enabling improvements
needed for future information technology security, and

b. Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) – NOAA requests an increase
of $9,500,000 and a total life cycle cost of $85,100,000 to initiate
refurbishment of the DSCOVR satellite, formerly known as Triana, and
development of a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) imager to maintain
continuity of solar wind data used for geomagnetic storm warnings

Getting to this level in the budget process for an L1 monitor is a big
step forward for NOAA. If approved in the final budget, and working
with our AF and NASA partners, it will put us on a path towards
ensuring future coronagraph and solar wind observations. Hopefully,
this will be the first step in recognizing that continuous measurements
are needed from L1 for operations (and for science as well).

c. Finally, the budget includes support for new and continuing space
weather observations from NOAA geostationary and polar satellites, and
from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and
Climate-2 (COSMIC-2) program.

———————————————————————–
2. University Computing Requests for NSF-supported University Projects:
Reminder on Large Request Deadline: March 29, 2010
———————————————————————–
From: Ginger Caldwell <cal at ucar.edu>

NCAR's Computational and Information Systems Laboratory (CISL) invites
NSF-supported university researchers in the atmospheric, oceanic, and
closely related sciences to submit large requests by March 29, 2010.

Allocations may be used on bluefire, an IBM POWER6 with 3,840 compute
processors. The median panel-reviewed request is now over 200,000 GAUs.
Very large requests with strong scientific and computational
justification are encouraged. Allocations are given for the life of
the NSF award.

Requests for less than 16,000 GAUs may be submitted at any time using
the "Small Request Form" at the URL below. Once the sum of small
allocations reaches 16,000 GAUs, the next request must be submitted
using the "Large Request Form" at the URL below by the panel deadline.
University researchers with NSF awards are encouraged to apply for a
small allocation to obtain information on the GAU requirements for
their research and to test the computational efficiency of their code
before applying for a large allocation.

Contact: Ginger Caldwell, Allocations Manager, NCAR/CISL
303-497-1229, cal@ucar.edu
Application form and additional information for computational requests:
http://www2.cisl.ucar.edu/allocations
Select the "Large Request Form" for a request over 16,000 GAUs.
Deadline: March 29, 2010

———————————————————————–
3. Solar Orbiter Selected for Next Phase of ESA's Cosmic Vision
Programme
———————————————————————–
From: Richard Marsden <Richard.Marsden at esa.int>

ESA's Science Programme Committee (SPC) recently approved three "Medium
(M)-class" missions to enter the so-called definition phase. This is
the next step required before the final decision is taken as to which
missions are implemented in the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision
2015-2025 programme. The three proposals chosen to proceed are (in
alphabetical order) Euclid, PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of
stars (PLATO), and Solar Orbiter. The three missions are the finalists
from 52 Cosmic Vision proposals that were either made or carried
forward in 2007. Only two missions out of the three can be selected for
the M-class launch slots. Solar Orbiter, an ESA-led solar-heliospheric
mission in partnership with NASA, would take the closest look at our
Sun yet possible, approaching to just 62 solar radii. It would deliver
images and data that include views of the Sun's polar regions and the
solar far side when it is not visible from Earth. The final decision
about which missions to implement will be taken after the definition
activities are completed, which is foreseen to be in mid-2011. Further
information on Solar Orbiter is available at:

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/area/index.cfm?fareaid=45

———————————————————————–
4. RapidMag Project Delivers Near-real-time Magnetometer Data from
Auroral Zone Stations in Russia
———————————————————————–
From: Kazue Takahashi <Kazue.Takahashi at jhuapl.edu>

We are pleased to announce that 1-minute resolution ground magnetometer
data are now stably available from the 4 Russian auroral zone stations:

Amderma (69.5N, 61.4E, geographic)
Dikson Island (73.6N, 80.6E)
Tixie Bay (71.6N, 129.0E)
Pebek (70.1N, 170.9E)

This was made possible by a recent system upgrade completed by Oleg
Troshichev and Alexander Janzhura as part of the international project
entitled Russian Auroral and Ionospheric Disturbance Magnetometers
(RapidMag). The stations have been in operation for a number of years
but the data flow was often disrupted in the past. Spanning 110 degrees
of longitude, the data are valuable for space weather studies and vital
for timely production of the AE index (please go to
http://wdc.kugi.kyoto-u.ac.jp/ae_realtime/index.html). The data can be
viewed in near-real-time (typical delay ~1 hour) at the RapidMag
homepage and at the linked websites of the participating institutions.
Digital data from individual stations are available by contacting a
RapidMag team member.

For more information please visit the RapidMag homepage:
http://sd-www.jhuapl.edu/rapidmag/

The participating institutions of RapidMag are: Arctic and Antarctic
Research Institute (AARI), Russia; Institute for Dynamics of Geospheres
(IDG), Russia; World Data Center (WDC) for Geomagnetism, Kyoto
University,
Japan; National Institute of Information and Communications Technology
(NICT), Japan; Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
(JHU/APL), USA. RapidMag is in part supported by the United States
National Science Foundation (NSF).

———————————————————————–
5. Final Announcement: The 12th Quadrennial Solar-Terrestrial Physics
Symposium of SCOSTEP, July 12-16, 2010, Berlin, Germany
***Deadline for Abstract Submission is April 6, 2010***
———————————————————————–
From: Franz-Josef Luebken <luebken at iap-kborn.de>,
Chairman of the local organizing committee

The Scientific Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Physics (SCOSTEP)
(http://www.scostep.ucar.edu) will held its next quadrennial
international symposium on Solar-Terrestrial Physics (STP-12) on 12-16
July 2010 in Berlin, Germany. The main theme of the symposium is on the
Climate and Weather in the Sun-Earth System (CAWSES) program, which has
the overall goals of fostering a scientific approach to understanding
the short and long term variability of the integrated solar-terrestrial
environment. More detailed information on the symposium can be found
online at http://www.iap-kborn.de/SCOSTEP2010.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION DEADLINE: April 6, 2010.

———————————————————————–
6. Abstract Deadline for EJSM Open Science Workshop – 15th April 2010
———————————————————————–
From: Michele Dougherty <m.dougherty at imperial.ac.uk>

The abstract deadline for this workshop has been extended to 15th April
2010, please see the web page below for information on abstract details,
registration and an update of what the workshop will cover.

EJSM Open Science Workshop
17 – 19 May 2010
Address: ESTEC, Noordwijk
Country: The Netherlands
More info: http://jakal.sp.ph.ic.ac.uk/EJSM/

The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) is an international mission to
the Jupiter system with joint participation from ESA and NASA.

The ESA-NASA Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) consists of two
primary flight elements operating in the Jovian system: the ESA-led
Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) and the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter
(JEO). JGO and JEO will execute an extended choreographed exploration
of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Ganymede and
Europa, respectively. The overarching goal of EJSM is the study of the
emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. JGO and JEO will carry
complementary instruments to achieve the following science objectives:
characterize Ganymede and Europa as planetary objects and potential
habitats, study Ganymede, Europa, Callisto and Io in the broader
context of the system of Galilean satellites and focus on Jupiter
science including the planet, its atmosphere and the magnetosphere as a
coupled system.

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